April 26th – Focus Group: 16mm Direct Animation Screening

April 26th, 2014
5pm
Visual Arts Center (map)
Free!
(Find out how to get free parking for this event!)

Add to Calendar 04-26-2014 11:00:00 04-26-2014 20:00:00 11 FOCUS GROUP: 16mm Direct Animation Workshop Focus Group welcomes filmmakers Rachel Stuckey and Lee Webster, who will lead a workshop that explores cameraless animation, with a curated screening! Free! Full details at http://www.ercatx.org/april-26th-focus-group-16mm-direct-animation-workshop/ 2300 Trinity St, Austin, TX 78712 Experimental Response Cinema admin@ercatx.org https://www.facebook.com/events/668479496530690/ false MM/DD/YYYY

This screening concludes the 16mm Direct Animation Workshop. Films made by workshop attendees will also be shown. See the page on the Visual Arts Center for additional info

Program

Mothlight by Stan Brakhage
4 min / 16mm / silent / 1963
Essence of lepidoptera re-created between two strips of clear mylar tape: an anima animation. What a moth might see from birth to death if black were white and white were black.
“Brakhage made MOTHLIGHT without a camera. He just pasted mothwings and flowers on a clear strip of film and ran it through the printing machine.” – Jonas Mekas “MOTHLIGHT is a paradoxical preservation of pieces of dead moths in the eternal medium of light (which is life and draws the moth to death); so it flutters through its very disintegration. This abstract of flight captures matter’s struggle to assume its proper form; the death of the moth does not cancel its nature, which on the filmstrip asserts itself. MOTHLIGHT is on one level a parable of death and resurrection, but most really concerns the persistence of the essential form, image, and motion of being.” – Ken Kelman

The Girl’s Nervy by Jennifer Reeves
5 min / 16mm / sound / 1995
Exuberant rhythms are created for the eyes in this nostalgic study of the single film frame, through cutting, pasting, and painting clear and photographed film images. Fleeting shapes in lush, spattered color flicker and dance to big band beats.

ARAPADAPTOR (I Feel So) by Anna Geyer
5 min / 16mm / sound / 2003
ARAPADAPTOR (I Feel So) is an abstract film of mostly found sound and cameraless images. Most of the source material was unwittingly supplied by a Chinese herbalist. To produce ARAPADAPTOR I applied my flashlight and laser, a la Man Ray, to the caterpillars, cicadas and seeds of the herbal packages, and this was only the eginning.Much of the original footage was further manipulated – painted, tinted and/or bleached. Finally, the images were rephotographed, slowed, through the use of an optical printer.

Matters of Bioluminescence by Robbie Land
8 min / 16mm / silent / 2012
“Matters of Bioluminescence” is a personal documentation of the bioluminescent phenomena. I am utilizing various conventional and unconventional methods to explore and document these organisms and provide a profound perspective.
The film begins with a time-lapse of fireflies and various raw film stocks contained in a glass jar. The second portion of the film is the abstract result the bioluminescent insects create with the light sensitive film. Chapter two consists of foxfire, the glowing mushrooms. Mushrooms are filmed in their environment using time-exposure cameras and therefore demonstrates the waxing and waning of the fungi’s’ luminescence. The mushrooms are also placed directly onto various raw film stocks generating an animated illustration of foxfire as it burns its image into the film.

Black and White Trypps #1 by Ben Russell
6:30 min / 16mm / sound / 2003
“A night sky fills with light shimmers and flecks, surface markings, heavenly bodies. It’s an ocean, a well, a screen, a mirror, a portal. Blackness/void cluttered by growing ephemera. Dark reaches of outer and inner space gradually sifts through shards of granite and diamonds. The mind races as the material becomes greater and more frenetic, reaching a nearly audibly grinding pitch of excitement, flurry, and instantaneous infinity that ebbs at first and then maintains. Flashes of color emerge or are imagined. Chaotic flickering of dancing peasant girls and violently twisting astronaut helmets. Layers of sea slime over undulating life forms. Bonfires and celebration. Explosions, construction. Holocausts. Primordial ooze, modern civilization. Ages and seconds. Floating heads circle kaleidoscopic bursts of shiny beads. Everything everywhere twists, forces through, transforms into, overlaps everything else. Seashells, snow, jewels, static, planets, mitochondria, trash, leaves. Rings, flowers, stars, hair, ghosts, comets, cartoons, demons. Icebubblesinstrumentscats marblestwigsfireflie spinwheelsinsectscraters. Buzzing. Reeling#..flfkkkkk ########################## ########################################################################### #Overkill. Birth/ Death. Moment by moment, symmetrical-organized like geometry, like Muslim rugs, like math.”
– JT Rogstad, The International Exposition (TIE)
“Tying into and playing against the rich history of hand-painted films, the first Trypp starts off with lulling rhythms of interstellar undulations. But instead of referencing the romantic traditions of most cameraless films, as the impasto grows denser this Trypp turns into a fugue state inducing flurry of op art kineticism. The screen becomes a snowglobe of activity to scramble your eye’s rods into cones.”
– Chris Stults, Viennale 2009